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Technology-enhanced learning objects and learning outcomes The first part of my research was about the way secondary school teachers use their LMS (Learning Management System). The results have been published recently. I will upload that paper here as well very...

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Technology-enhanced learning objects and learning outcomes The first part of my research was about the way secondary school teachers use their LMS (Learning Management System). The results have been published recently. I will upload that paper here as well very...

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Researching instructional use and the technology acceptation... Time flies. Only one more year to go in my PhD-track! From now on, the only thing I will do is writing and writing. Luckily the first part of my research has been published already (a preprint version). The...

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Wiki's in het onderwijs (Dutch papers) In het verleden schreef ik 2 artikels in het Nederlands over wiki's. Zijn wiki's nieuw voor u? Dan is het eerste artikel 'Het gebruik van wiki’s in het onderwijs' een goed startpunt. Zoekt u concrete...

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Network visual

Posted by @drsmetty | Posted in Personal | Posted on 04-02-2011

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2

LinkedIn has never been the most sexy service out there. But lately, they have done some improvements that I appreciate.

They just introduced InMaps (found via BVLG), a product that let’s you visualize your network. The result is a color-coded map that represents the different groups in your network. Colors are given to people who have (or had) the same employer, people working in the same industry etc. This is my map (click to enlarge):

On my map, I found 3 groups related to a former employer, 2 groups who are related to a specific industry and 3 groups who where difficult to label. A lot of my network consists of people I met on unconferences, blogdinners or via social media networks. The only thing they have in common is a blog and/or a Twitter-account.

Something interesting are the bigger names on your map. They represent people who are the most connected within that specific cluster or group. Most probably they are they are the ‘influentials’ within that group.

One more thing. I can’t really see who is closest to me on the map, but one of them is my better half. Funny.

Comments (2)

It is a brilliant idea, but it does not seem to work in my case:
http://inmaps.linkedinlabs.com/share/Fons_Tuinstra/244330735007046676568986019870773852712
Different sections of my network (China, Dutch, new media, speakers) pop up at random.
Now, do I have a problem with my network or is this an illustration of the failure of LinkedIn to get it right?

Maybe they haven’t adapted to the idea of a global world yet…

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